The Parnassus Times

April 7, 2008

The List is Life: #86

86.

The Dame;

Julie Walters.

Julie Walters first came to the attention of screen audiences in 1983 when she starred alongside Michael Caine in the film adaptation of Willy Russell’s Educating Rita, she landed a BAFTA win and scored an Oscar nomination with her first major film role. Always remaining true to her roots, she never really sold her soul to Hollywood, continuing to do most of her work on British TV throughout the 80s, continuing to establish herself as one of the brightest comiediennes of her generation. Her work in the 90s consisted mainly of TV movies before at the turn of the century she landed an immense career relaunching role in Stephen Daldry’s Billy Elliott, her immense warmth, and earthly generosity, brightening up the bleak landscapes of northern England. The following year she landed the role of Molly Weasley in the Harry Potter films and a level of fame she had never experienced came her way, her newfound status helped to keep her working consistently in film on projects such as Calender Girls, Wah-Wah, Becoming Jane and Mamma Mia! her newfound status as a connoisseur of bright, middle aged supporting roles ensuring she should be working on screen for a long time to come.

The Dude;

Johnny Depp.

Performing on screen since his early 20s, Johnny Depp is a performer that for the majority of his career to date refused to cash in on the pretty boy looks that made him so popular, instead choosing to work in quirkier, more unconventional roles. Films such as Edward Scissorhands, Benny & Joon, Dead Man and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Perhaps towering above all, his performance as the titular character in frequent collaborator Tim Burton’s Ed Wood was a masterclass in naivity, in heartfelt passion, in unwavering determination, it is, quite simply, one of the better performances of recent times. In recent years he has taken a turn towards the more mainstream roles that have made him a worldwide icon, perhaps now as a parent, feeling a greater need to entertain the planet’s youth, he has still managed to turn in at least one magnificent performance, as the nothing less than legendary Captain Jack Sparrow in Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy, Depp has entirely realigned the common image of the pirate, rewriting a once savage, macho persona with something far more akin to a glam rock star. If for nothing else (and it would be a shame if a decade’s great work were overlooked) Depp has ensure he will be forever stamped upon cinema legend for making that inspired choice and redefining piratehood for all. Always most impressive in these quirky roles, it would be alot better for everyone if he could continue to find those parts that stretch him as a performer and allow him to make those choices, instead of allowing him to settle into the middle aged laziness that is far below his capabilities.

The Director;

Luchino Visconti.

Born into one of Northern Italy’s richest families, that Luchino Visconti went on to become one of the founding fathers of the Italian neo-realism movement is something of a surprise. When one learns that he was a supporter of the Italian communist party, that he was not entirely content with his position in life becomes far more apparent. Starting in the business in the mid 30s as assistant director to Jean Renoir before meeting Roberto Rossellini, together the two joined with Benito Mussolini’s son Vittorio, the national arbitrator for cinema and the arts and from there his own career took off, making his debut in 1943 with Ossessione, an adaptation of James M. Cain’s The Postman Always Rings Twice, he continued to delve in the neo-realist genre that he had helped establish, his premier work came four years later with La Terra Trema a chronicle of the difficult lives of the inhabitants of a Sicilian Fishing village. Starting with his 1954 film Senso, Visconti began to shift away from neorealism, as he drifted into the 60s, Visconti’s films began to come more personal in nature, his 1963 Burt Lancaster Il Gattopardo (The Leopard) probably his best remembered film detaling the decline of the Sicilian aristocracy from which the director himself had emerged. Visconti continued working right up until the year of his death in 1976, and though the neorealism that he is still best remembered for was long gone, he was still making a point, right until the end.

The Picture;

Pinocchio (Hamilton Luske & Ben Sharpsteen, 1940)

The puppet Pinocchio first appeared in an 1883 childrens novel The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi, however there can be no doubt that the most iconic version of the story (as with so many of their animated adaptations) is the one that Walt Disney turned out in 1940. The story of a wooden boy, filled with more life and heart than most human filled stories. Pinocchio features a naive yet loveable lead character who in the immortal Jiminy Cricket has one of the great screen sidekicks in history. The loving family (make that father and 2 pets) that he leaves behind are as caring and memorable a group as Disney have ever come up with, and the film is populated from head to toe with supporting players each as vividly memorable as the last. Though now almost 70 years old and a Disney family classic, the film is also shot through with an incredibly dark streak, nasty supporting characters, a monstrous whale and one of the most horrific scenes ever to feature in a children’s movie that will certainly ensure you never look at a donkey the same way again. It’s a magical film, filled to the brim with what at times seems like an almost infinite darkness, but shining through it all, that little ray of hope, of good, and it never relents.

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March 19, 2008

The List is Life: #92

92.

The Dame;

Jean Simmons.

Jean Simmons came to the fore in the latter half of the 40s taking on two classical literary rules as the young Estella in David Lean’s Great Expectations, whose classic bitchiness bewitched the lead character, then 2 year later, she took on the role of of Ophelia in Olivier’s Best Picture winning, Hamlet  and at the age of just 20, picked up her first Oscar nomination. In the 60 years since then she has starred in an incredibly wide variety of films, from musicals, to swords and sandals Roman epics, animated films and Westerns. She has one of the longest most successful and varied careers in Hollywood history and is still going strong.

The Dude;

Morgan Freeman.

In an age of ‘stars’ both lacking in charisma and talent breaking into the spotlight in their teens it is quite something to believe that Morgan Freeman did not become a star until the age of 52, 1989 starring in both Glory  and the Best Picture winner Driving Miss Daisy  he was suddenly catapulted to fame after 18 years in the business and in the almost two decades since that breakthrough he has time and time again, established himself as an absolutel legend in the industry. His monumental turn at the heart of The Shawshank Redemption  probably remains the crown jewel in his career to date, but fine work under the Oscar winning work of Clint Eastwood in Unforgiven  and Million Dollar Baby has added to that prestige and playing the character he played in Bruce Almighty  certainly helped to shine a light on the general consensus of Morgan Freeman.

The Director;

Ben Sharpsteen.

Ben Sharpsteen is a man who worked a 60 year career for Walt Disney, yet across those 60 years his reputation as an icon of animation  was solidified by a 2 year period when he turned out Fantasia  and Pinocchio  in 1940, and Dumbo  in 1941, three all time classics of animated cinema, guided to the screen by the same man. Sadly he spent the rest of his career working mainly as a producer and his only directorial output came in the form of documentary shorts but those three legendary pictures proved more than many can manage in a lifetime and ensure that his reputation in the business is preserved forever.

The Picture;

Spiderman 2 (Sam Raimi, 2004)

When Sam Raimi brought Spiderman, the most iconic of Marvel superheroes to the big screen in 2002 his effort was met with rapturous approval as he turned in a wonderfully executed origina story with a great lead performance from it’s hero Tobey Maguire and remained true to the light comic book touch of its source. Yet it was at heart, just an origin story, and when all involved returned 2 years laters for the sequel they eclipsed their original effort in every possible way. It is an altogether bigger affair with a more complex villain, a far more powerful emotional story at its centre, Tobey Maguire on even better form than before, moment after moment of laugh out loud comedy and beautifully played heartaching humanity and one of the most satisfying conclusions in the history of the movies. It is pure and simply one of the most enjoyable moviewatching experiences that there is.

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