The Parnassus Times

April 5, 2008

The List is Life: #88

88.

The Dame;

Joan Crawford.

Perhaps most readily remembered for her feud with Bette Davis which came to a head in 1962 with her being blown off the screen in Whatever Happened To Baby Jane? and maybe forever tainted by the damning portrait painted by a bitter daughter in Mommie Dearest, the career that Joan Crawford enjoyed for over 30 years beginning at the dawn of the sound era seems to have been generally forgotten. She was an Academy Award winning actress with numerous acclaimed films under her belt, she worked with major directors and major performers. In Mildred Pierce she gave one of the more iconic performances of the golden era, and a decade later in Nicholas Ray’s Johnny Guitar, she took the lead as the westen was turned on its head, with strong women in the central roles. One of the greatest of the greatest age, she has insured that she’ll never be forgotten.

The Dude;

Paul Schneider.

Entering into the acting profession at the age of 24 (making him a late comer by todays standards) in the films of David Gordon Green, George Washington and more notably as the lead alongside Zooey Deschanel in All the Real Girls, Paul Schneider has in a just a few short years established himself as one of the more accomplished supporting actors in the movies today. In 2005 he took a side role in Cameron Crowe’s Elizabethtown and with his quirky small town simplicity, literally stole the show from the leads. Then in 2007 he had what could be termed a breakthrough year, with polar opposite roles. Firstly appearing as the villainous Dick Liddil in The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, a supporting role that he filled with both sinful sleaze and unabashed charm in equal degree, and an almost entirely opposite turn as a quiet, loving brother trying his best to cope with an awkward situation in Lars and the Real Girl. He’s a wonderfully subtle, assured and diverse actor whose career is certainly heading for great heights.

The Director;

Sydney Pollack.

I would venture to say that Sydney Pollack’s finest accomplishments have come in front of the camera rather than behind it. Always taking small roles in movies, he has on more than one occasion, ended up being the finest member of the cast, perhaps most notably in his tiny role in Stanley Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut. However none of these on screen accomplishments can take away from the fact that Pollack is an Academy Award winning director and producer. It was his Robert Redford-Meryl Streep epic Out of Africa that brought him this acclaim, but from where I am sitting his finest work comes in smaller, more character driven movies, where the performers, not the wondrous grandeur take centre stage. As the tagline to his 1969 Jane Fonda vehicle¬† They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? declared, “People are the ultimate spectacle” and rarely is that more in evidence than in Sydney Pollack’s films.

The Picture;

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (Steven Spielberg, 1977)

Though most widely remembered for the grandiosity of the final sequence, Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind is a film that is at heart one of his most intimate and human films. Driven at full force by a wonderful performance from Richard Dreyfuss, who won the Oscar for 1977’s The Goodbye Girl, but should probably have picked up the award for this film. It is a performance both comic and dramatic, filled with the wondrous curiousity of an overgrown child yet at the same time shot through with a certain darkness in its examination of a mans obsession and subsequent neglect of his family. It is that performance around which this film is built; there are brief moments of alien spectacle propping it up throughout, making sure that we remember that we are truly not alone in this one, all mysterious, all beautiful to behold but ambiguous in intent, and it all builds to a wondrous crescendo, that magnificently glorious finale in which all is revealed, truly epic spectacle, human curiousity and those 5 beautiful notes.

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March 20, 2008

The List is Life: #91

91.

The Dame;

Parker Posey.

One of the finest comedians of her generation, Parker Posey is an actress who though not lacking in roles in major films such as Superman Returns (in which she was criminally underused) and Blade: Trinity (which simply wasn’t worth the effort) is at her best in small indie comedies, primarily those helmed by Christopher Guest in which she manages to shine, time and again. Rarely does she manage to land roles that are worthy of her pretty immense talent, but when watching her at her best in those Guest mockumentaries, one can only shake their head in disbelief at how she has not managed to reach a level of success that she unquestionably deserves.

The Dude;

Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

When Joseph Gordon-Levitt got his start on 3rd Rock From the Sun, few could have predicted what lay ahead for the youngster, yet in 1999s 10 Things I Hate About You when he starred in a cast full of bright young talents he displayed enouch charm and charisma to prove himsef as a more than capable leading man and few years down the line in 2004’s dark indie drama Mysterious Skin he stepped up to the plate and proved his creentials with a dark brooding yet sensitive and soulful turn, following it up with a commanding and powerfully confident turn in Rian Johnson’s high school noir, Brick, and then again in The Lookout in which he again took the central role at the head of an impressive cast and lead the way with tremendous conviction. At the age of just 27 the youngster is showing a great deal of integrity in the type of projects he continues to choose and seems to constantly be progressing as an actor. Probably the brightest young American actor there is.

The Director;

Kim Ki-Duk.

In the early 90s, Kim Ki-Duk studied fine arts in Paris, and when one looks at the sheer beauty with which he composes each frame, that is not something that comes as a huge surprise. After completing those studies he first got started in the film industry as a screenwriter, winning numerous awards before going onto make his directorial debut in 1996. Since then he has directed well over 10 films and that artistic beauty has remained throughout, he is also a man very much in love with the visual element of storytelling. His films are very often lacking in much dialogue, allowing the story to unfold visually, to see rather than be told, and it is that keen understanding of the core cinematic language that makes him one of the most captivating director working today.

The Picture;

The Fisher King  (Terry Gilliam, 1991)

Terry Gilliam is known for his bizarre journies into strange cinematic worlds, well known for his troublesome picturs that often alienate all but the very smallest cult of fans, he is a man who has always had grand aspirations yet not always managed to scale the heights of cinematic success the same way that he scales the walls of imagination. Yet in 1991 following the grand oddity that was The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, he turned in a film, that by his standards at least, would be considered normal. The Fisher King is a film set very much in the real world, yet featuring a dreamer with the most vivid sense of imagination, a film which more than likely draws from the directors own life as a cinematic artist. It is a film about redemption and awakenings, about the power of dreams and with a subplot that surely ranks amongst the very greatest cinematic love stories. A bizarre love letter to dreams and possibilities.

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