The Parnassus Times

March 20, 2008

The List is Life: #91

91.

The Dame;

Parker Posey.

One of the finest comedians of her generation, Parker Posey is an actress who though not lacking in roles in major films such as Superman Returns (in which she was criminally underused) and Blade: Trinity (which simply wasn’t worth the effort) is at her best in small indie comedies, primarily those helmed by Christopher Guest in which she manages to shine, time and again. Rarely does she manage to land roles that are worthy of her pretty immense talent, but when watching her at her best in those Guest mockumentaries, one can only shake their head in disbelief at how she has not managed to reach a level of success that she unquestionably deserves.

The Dude;

Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

When Joseph Gordon-Levitt got his start on 3rd Rock From the Sun, few could have predicted what lay ahead for the youngster, yet in 1999s 10 Things I Hate About You when he starred in a cast full of bright young talents he displayed enouch charm and charisma to prove himsef as a more than capable leading man and few years down the line in 2004’s dark indie drama Mysterious Skin he stepped up to the plate and proved his creentials with a dark brooding yet sensitive and soulful turn, following it up with a commanding and powerfully confident turn in Rian Johnson’s high school noir, Brick, and then again in The Lookout in which he again took the central role at the head of an impressive cast and lead the way with tremendous conviction. At the age of just 27 the youngster is showing a great deal of integrity in the type of projects he continues to choose and seems to constantly be progressing as an actor. Probably the brightest young American actor there is.

The Director;

Kim Ki-Duk.

In the early 90s, Kim Ki-Duk studied fine arts in Paris, and when one looks at the sheer beauty with which he composes each frame, that is not something that comes as a huge surprise. After completing those studies he first got started in the film industry as a screenwriter, winning numerous awards before going onto make his directorial debut in 1996. Since then he has directed well over 10 films and that artistic beauty has remained throughout, he is also a man very much in love with the visual element of storytelling. His films are very often lacking in much dialogue, allowing the story to unfold visually, to see rather than be told, and it is that keen understanding of the core cinematic language that makes him one of the most captivating director working today.

The Picture;

The Fisher King  (Terry Gilliam, 1991)

Terry Gilliam is known for his bizarre journies into strange cinematic worlds, well known for his troublesome picturs that often alienate all but the very smallest cult of fans, he is a man who has always had grand aspirations yet not always managed to scale the heights of cinematic success the same way that he scales the walls of imagination. Yet in 1991 following the grand oddity that was The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, he turned in a film, that by his standards at least, would be considered normal. The Fisher King is a film set very much in the real world, yet featuring a dreamer with the most vivid sense of imagination, a film which more than likely draws from the directors own life as a cinematic artist. It is a film about redemption and awakenings, about the power of dreams and with a subplot that surely ranks amongst the very greatest cinematic love stories. A bizarre love letter to dreams and possibilities.

March 13, 2008

The List is Life: #98

98.

The Dame;

Paulette Goddard.

 Despite appearing in many fine films throughout the 30s and 40s not least as one of an all star cast in George Cukor’s The Women, Paulette Goddards career is most widely remembered for her place alongside Charles Chaplin in his masterful pictures Modern Times  and The Great Dictator. Chaplin’s Tramp was, and is, an iconic film character, and Paulette Goodard was the finest of all his leading ladies.

The Dude;

Harrison Ford.

One of the all time great movie stars. With more charm than a hundred cocky pretenders that have come in his wake, Harrison Ford emerged from humble beginnings in carpentry to become one of the cinemas great icons. Whether as the charismatic rogues in superstar franchises Star Wars  and Indiana Jones, working alongside cinematic maestros in films like Blade Runner, Witness  and Frantic or putting that effortless charm to perfect use as the driving force between riotously entertaining pictures like The Fugitive, Harrison Ford has remained a star throughout. 31 years after his initial breakthrough the man is still going strong and preparing to don that most legendary of fedoras one more time.

The Director;

George Lucas.

Though with each passing year since he first ventured into that galaxy, far far away George Lucas has become more a cinematic mogul than a filmmaker, the influence that he has had on the film business is absolutely unquestionable. From his earliest travels into the realms of Sci-Fi with THX-1138  through his nostalgic, teen movie gem American Graffiti  and into that immortal galaxy of filmic legend Lucas has proven himself a trail blazer and innovator in the medium. The influence of Star Wars  on the way major movies were made is unparalleled and the work that his THX sound company and Industrial Light & Magic visual effects company is beyond comparison. George Lucas has branched beyond his far off galaxy to have a mighty influence on the world of cinema.

The Picture;

Suspiria (Dario Argento, 1977)

The greatest slasher film ever made. Dario Argento’s horror masterpiece is a perfect exercise in the creation of fearful atmospheres and a masterclass in the use of wide open spaces to rack up unbearable tension. Accompanied by one of the creepiest scores in cinematic history, Argento uses vivid colours, darkness, empty space, and the elements in addition to the giallo genre’s trademark gore to present the viewer with the sort of terrifying experience that is not easily forgotten.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.