The Parnassus Times

March 13, 2008

The List is Life: #98

98.

The Dame;

Paulette Goddard.

 Despite appearing in many fine films throughout the 30s and 40s not least as one of an all star cast in George Cukor’s The Women, Paulette Goddards career is most widely remembered for her place alongside Charles Chaplin in his masterful pictures Modern Times  and The Great Dictator. Chaplin’s Tramp was, and is, an iconic film character, and Paulette Goodard was the finest of all his leading ladies.

The Dude;

Harrison Ford.

One of the all time great movie stars. With more charm than a hundred cocky pretenders that have come in his wake, Harrison Ford emerged from humble beginnings in carpentry to become one of the cinemas great icons. Whether as the charismatic rogues in superstar franchises Star Wars  and Indiana Jones, working alongside cinematic maestros in films like Blade Runner, Witness  and Frantic or putting that effortless charm to perfect use as the driving force between riotously entertaining pictures like The Fugitive, Harrison Ford has remained a star throughout. 31 years after his initial breakthrough the man is still going strong and preparing to don that most legendary of fedoras one more time.

The Director;

George Lucas.

Though with each passing year since he first ventured into that galaxy, far far away George Lucas has become more a cinematic mogul than a filmmaker, the influence that he has had on the film business is absolutely unquestionable. From his earliest travels into the realms of Sci-Fi with THX-1138  through his nostalgic, teen movie gem American Graffiti  and into that immortal galaxy of filmic legend Lucas has proven himself a trail blazer and innovator in the medium. The influence of Star Wars  on the way major movies were made is unparalleled and the work that his THX sound company and Industrial Light & Magic visual effects company is beyond comparison. George Lucas has branched beyond his far off galaxy to have a mighty influence on the world of cinema.

The Picture;

Suspiria (Dario Argento, 1977)

The greatest slasher film ever made. Dario Argento’s horror masterpiece is a perfect exercise in the creation of fearful atmospheres and a masterclass in the use of wide open spaces to rack up unbearable tension. Accompanied by one of the creepiest scores in cinematic history, Argento uses vivid colours, darkness, empty space, and the elements in addition to the giallo genre’s trademark gore to present the viewer with the sort of terrifying experience that is not easily forgotten.

March 12, 2008

The List is Life: #99

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99.

The Dame;

Lauren Bacall.

Making her screen debut alongside a Hollywood legend at the age of just 19 can’t have been easy, but were you to see the smouldering confidence with which Lauren Bacall carries herself through To Have and Have Not, alongside her soon to be husband, Humphrey Bogart, and you’d think she was a seasoned pro. For over 60 years she has continued to turn in highly confident and mature work, time and time again. Her legendary status cannot be denied, and her beauty has probably lead to her being tremendously overlooked as an actress.

The Dude;

Sean Connery.

An absolute pro. His marvellous physique made him the perfect super spy in his prime yet as the decades have gone by, Sean Connery has displayed a natural and effortless screen charisma that only the true legends of the game could claim to possess. That he numbers among their rank, cannot be denied.

The Director;

Victor Fleming.

Victor Fleming began his directing career making fairly low key silent films. He finished it in the 1940s, making star vehicles with Spencer Tracy as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Ingrid Bergman as Joan of Arc. Yet in the end his career has been eternally defined (and rightfully so) by the year 1939, in which he snatched up the reigns and took control of the troubled productions of two all time classics, The Wizard of Oz and Gone with the Wind. Two bonafide iconic films, from entirely different ends of the spectrum, both steereed to the screen by the same man in the same year. Not bad a for a fella who started life in the business as a stuntman.

The Picture;

The Jungle Book (Wolfgang Reitherman, 1967)

Based (albeit loosely) on the book by Rudyard Kipling and as the last Disney film overseen by the great man himself, The Jungle Book could have coasted on the reputation that such claims would have afforded it. Yet the studio managed, even in the wake of its creators passing to rise up and turn out one of their most beloved classics. Catchy songs from start to finish keep all entertained, characters that are both zany and bold ensure that this is an experience the viewer shall never forget and laying at the heart of this animal kingdom is an entirely human story about a child growing up and accepting his destiny. The darker nature of Kipling’s story may have been replaced by something altogether more family-friendly, but the deep humanity at heart remains throughout.

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