The Parnassus Times

March 21, 2008

The doctor is out.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — cigarettesalesman @ 3:48 pm

Im away for a week *sniff sniff*

back next Friday! Please don`t abandon me, you`re all I`ve got!

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March 20, 2008

The List is Life: #91

91.

The Dame;

Parker Posey.

One of the finest comedians of her generation, Parker Posey is an actress who though not lacking in roles in major films such as Superman Returns (in which she was criminally underused) and Blade: Trinity (which simply wasn’t worth the effort) is at her best in small indie comedies, primarily those helmed by Christopher Guest in which she manages to shine, time and again. Rarely does she manage to land roles that are worthy of her pretty immense talent, but when watching her at her best in those Guest mockumentaries, one can only shake their head in disbelief at how she has not managed to reach a level of success that she unquestionably deserves.

The Dude;

Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

When Joseph Gordon-Levitt got his start on 3rd Rock From the Sun, few could have predicted what lay ahead for the youngster, yet in 1999s 10 Things I Hate About You when he starred in a cast full of bright young talents he displayed enouch charm and charisma to prove himsef as a more than capable leading man and few years down the line in 2004’s dark indie drama Mysterious Skin he stepped up to the plate and proved his creentials with a dark brooding yet sensitive and soulful turn, following it up with a commanding and powerfully confident turn in Rian Johnson’s high school noir, Brick, and then again in The Lookout in which he again took the central role at the head of an impressive cast and lead the way with tremendous conviction. At the age of just 27 the youngster is showing a great deal of integrity in the type of projects he continues to choose and seems to constantly be progressing as an actor. Probably the brightest young American actor there is.

The Director;

Kim Ki-Duk.

In the early 90s, Kim Ki-Duk studied fine arts in Paris, and when one looks at the sheer beauty with which he composes each frame, that is not something that comes as a huge surprise. After completing those studies he first got started in the film industry as a screenwriter, winning numerous awards before going onto make his directorial debut in 1996. Since then he has directed well over 10 films and that artistic beauty has remained throughout, he is also a man very much in love with the visual element of storytelling. His films are very often lacking in much dialogue, allowing the story to unfold visually, to see rather than be told, and it is that keen understanding of the core cinematic language that makes him one of the most captivating director working today.

The Picture;

The Fisher King  (Terry Gilliam, 1991)

Terry Gilliam is known for his bizarre journies into strange cinematic worlds, well known for his troublesome picturs that often alienate all but the very smallest cult of fans, he is a man who has always had grand aspirations yet not always managed to scale the heights of cinematic success the same way that he scales the walls of imagination. Yet in 1991 following the grand oddity that was The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, he turned in a film, that by his standards at least, would be considered normal. The Fisher King is a film set very much in the real world, yet featuring a dreamer with the most vivid sense of imagination, a film which more than likely draws from the directors own life as a cinematic artist. It is a film about redemption and awakenings, about the power of dreams and with a subplot that surely ranks amongst the very greatest cinematic love stories. A bizarre love letter to dreams and possibilities.

March 19, 2008

The List is Life: #92

92.

The Dame;

Jean Simmons.

Jean Simmons came to the fore in the latter half of the 40s taking on two classical literary rules as the young Estella in David Lean’s Great Expectations, whose classic bitchiness bewitched the lead character, then 2 year later, she took on the role of of Ophelia in Olivier’s Best Picture winning, Hamlet  and at the age of just 20, picked up her first Oscar nomination. In the 60 years since then she has starred in an incredibly wide variety of films, from musicals, to swords and sandals Roman epics, animated films and Westerns. She has one of the longest most successful and varied careers in Hollywood history and is still going strong.

The Dude;

Morgan Freeman.

In an age of ‘stars’ both lacking in charisma and talent breaking into the spotlight in their teens it is quite something to believe that Morgan Freeman did not become a star until the age of 52, 1989 starring in both Glory  and the Best Picture winner Driving Miss Daisy  he was suddenly catapulted to fame after 18 years in the business and in the almost two decades since that breakthrough he has time and time again, established himself as an absolutel legend in the industry. His monumental turn at the heart of The Shawshank Redemption  probably remains the crown jewel in his career to date, but fine work under the Oscar winning work of Clint Eastwood in Unforgiven  and Million Dollar Baby has added to that prestige and playing the character he played in Bruce Almighty  certainly helped to shine a light on the general consensus of Morgan Freeman.

The Director;

Ben Sharpsteen.

Ben Sharpsteen is a man who worked a 60 year career for Walt Disney, yet across those 60 years his reputation as an icon of animation  was solidified by a 2 year period when he turned out Fantasia  and Pinocchio  in 1940, and Dumbo  in 1941, three all time classics of animated cinema, guided to the screen by the same man. Sadly he spent the rest of his career working mainly as a producer and his only directorial output came in the form of documentary shorts but those three legendary pictures proved more than many can manage in a lifetime and ensure that his reputation in the business is preserved forever.

The Picture;

Spiderman 2 (Sam Raimi, 2004)

When Sam Raimi brought Spiderman, the most iconic of Marvel superheroes to the big screen in 2002 his effort was met with rapturous approval as he turned in a wonderfully executed origina story with a great lead performance from it’s hero Tobey Maguire and remained true to the light comic book touch of its source. Yet it was at heart, just an origin story, and when all involved returned 2 years laters for the sequel they eclipsed their original effort in every possible way. It is an altogether bigger affair with a more complex villain, a far more powerful emotional story at its centre, Tobey Maguire on even better form than before, moment after moment of laugh out loud comedy and beautifully played heartaching humanity and one of the most satisfying conclusions in the history of the movies. It is pure and simply one of the most enjoyable moviewatching experiences that there is.

The List is Life: #93

93.

The Dame;

Kristin Scott Thomas.

An actress of incredible beauty who has remained in her career as she has always been, absolutely subtle. Never one for garish over the top theatrics or doing anything out of the oridnary to call attention to herself, Kristin Scott Thomas has enjoyed a long and varied career, in romance, in drama, in comedy and she has turned in wonderfully effective work without anywhere near the showiness of many of her peers. She’s the sort of actress one could envision triumping in the golden age of the cinema alongside someone like Garbo, a quie, restrained performer who lets her face do the talking.

The Dude;

Jeffrey Wright.

One of the most incredibly diverse and completely underrated actors of his generation. Jeffrey Wright might just be one of the best actors on the planet right now, and yet for some unknown reason he has never reached the status that he quite deserved. A Tony winning star of the stage, his first major screen turn came when he played the title character in Julian Schnabel’s Basquiat. Though not adverse to appearing in big productions like Casino Royale and the remakes of Shaft and The Manchurian Candidate, his star still refuses to refuse to rise any further. Having said that, whatever may come in the future, his crown jewel may always be the role for which he won his Tony and reprised for HBO to Emmy winning effect, in the powerful, funny and magnetic roles of Belize, Mr. Lies and The Angel of Europe in Tony Kushner’s epic, Angels in America.

The Director;

Oliver Stone.

A name almost synonomous with controversy, Oliver Stone is a Vietnam war veteran and watching the anger and passion that seems to brim over in his movies it is not difficult to comprehend. Never one to shy away from difficult subjects, Stone has delved into troubling aspects and probed the state of the world in Salvador, Platoon and the other two entries in his ‘Vietnam trilogy’, Nixon and perhaps his crowning achievement to date, the monstrously structed and gloriously edited JFK, though many may turn up their noses at the facts on display in the picture, what cannot be denied is Stone’s artistic capabilities in bringing them so fully and powerfully to screen. His World Trade Center movie may have been a great deal tamer than most had anticipated, with the director choosing to tell a heartwarming tale of human survival and the wider effects of the days actions over damning whoever may or may not have been responsible, but with a George W. Bush biopic on the horizon, one can bet that Oliver Stone will soon be ruffling feathers once more.

The Picture;

After Hours (Martin Scorsese, 1985)

A blackly, creepy, comic look at life in the big city after dark. A haunting yet humorous look at the underbelly of society that will leave the majority of those who view it, appreciating what they have a great deal more. This is not the typical Scorsese picture, only coming his way when financing for his ambitious epic The Last Temptation of Christ fell through, the director comes onto the picture and injects it with his trademark dark, probing look at what can only be described as unordinary human beings. Taking a cast of up and comers and supporting players he crafts marvellously unsettling yet hugely entertaining picture that has more than a little heart to back up its eerie thrills.

March 17, 2008

The List is Life: #94

94.

The Dame;

Nicole Kidman.

Despite being one of the biggest movie stars in business for over a decade and having being best known at one point more for making up one half of the ultimate Hollywood power couple rather than for her movie roles, Nicole Kidman stepped up to the plate at the turn of the century and proved once and for all that she could turn out magnificent work on screen on a regular basis. Prior to her double hit in 2001 with the creepy horror The Others and her Oscar nominated turn in the musical Moulin Rouge! Kidman’s only real performance of note had come under the direction of Gus van Sant in 1995s To Die For, post 2001 she enjoyed a few years of marvellous success in which she took risks entirely foreign to stars of her status, Birthday Girl, The Hours, Dogville, and Birth all proved her capabilities as an actress on smaller and more serious scales. Though since 2004, success has generally eluded her, her participation in movies such as Fur and Margot at the Wedding prove she is still willing to take those risks, and that can never be a bad thing.

The Dude;

Steve Buscemi.

Perhaps the ultimate king of indie cinema. After taking bit parts in the Coen bros. Miller’s Crossing and Barton Fink, Steve Buscemi rocketed to fame as Mr. Pink in Quentin Tarantino’s Resevoir Dogs. Since then he has enjoyed a wonderfully varied career as an actor, taking part in the tiniest indie films yet still keeping his profile alive in big budget pictures such as Armageddon, Monster’s Inc. and The Island. Buscemi has also enjoyed success behind the camera, directing small indie films, perhaps most notably 2007’s Interview, as well episodes of HBO shows, Oz and The Sopranos, the latter of which he had a tremendous part on during the shows fifth season. Buscemi is that rare kind of performer who has managed to remain a famous name in major movies without ever selling out his crediblity.

The Director;

Sam Mendes.

Coming from the world of theatre, few could have judged Sam Mendes if he had kept to the style that he knew, as many have done before him. Yet in his three feature films to date, Mendes has displayed a magnificent eye for gloriously cinematic visuals, mixing that visual flair with beautifully human stories he has quickly emerged as one of the more exciting directors in American cinema. Having picked up the Academy Award for direction with his debut film and having that very same film win Best Picture cannot have been an easy act to follow, but so far Mendes has remained varied and interesting and it would not be a surprise to see him surpass that marvellous debut at least once in the future.

The Picture;

The Searchers (John Ford, 1956)

John Ford and John Wayne began collaborating in 1939 with Stagecoach, yet their most famous cinematic pairing came 17 years later with their landmark work in The Searchers. Wayne had played outlaws and men of immensely tough spirit yet never before had he gone to the lengths that he had done in this film, his Ethan Edwards was a racist, obsessive, borderline psychopath and these themes radiated throughout the movie. It was not the first film to explore these themes but certainly one of the first to probe them to the extent that it was done here. Fords attempts to delve into the plight of the Native American and the abuse they were subjected to was many a year ahead of its time to the point of being nothing but a modest commercial success upon initial release, yet as the years have gone by, its status has grown and the way it examines the formation of a nation holds up as well and as powerfully today as it has ever done.

March 16, 2008

The List is Life: #95

95.

The Dame;

Lily Tomlin.

Since her career took off during the 1960s, Lily Tomlin is an actress who has found great success on television, film,  and with her famed one woman shows on stage. Her most famous  cinematic collaborator is unquestionably Robert Altman with whom she made four films, including earning her one and only Oscar nomination to date in his Nashville, and was one of the standouts in his swansong, A Prairie Home Companion. She is a wonderously electric comedic performer, yet at the same time so perfectly adept at finding small, beautiful moments of humanity whenever she ventures into dramatic territory.

The Dude;

Steve Carell.

Though unquestionably loud, the majority of times that he appears on screen, Steve Carell is at the same time, incredibly subtle in the small moments. Small glances, shrugs, and gestures that add layers of depth and humanity to the laugh out loud moments of riotous comedy. His performance in Little Miss Sunshine works in complete contrast to almost everything that he has done in that, though full of humour, it is entirely deadpan and laying beneath everything is a heartbroken melancholy. I don’t think it would be too much of a stretch to say that even with his worldwide fame, Steve Carell probably doesn’t get enough credit as an actor.

The Director;

Stanley Donen.

The director of iconic films brimming with iconic moments, the sailors of his debut, On the Town, letting loose in New York, New York, Cary Grant’s last great screen hurrah, alongside Audrey Hepburn in Charade, Peter Cook and Dudley Moore unleashed upon cinema audiences in Bewitched, those Seven Brides for those Seven Brothers and of course, Gene Kelly in the rain, dancing his way to immortality. Donen’s forte was generally in the musical arena, yet when the songs were nowhere to be found, the fun certainly never dreid up. His films were always fun, always a breeze to watch; he was not a director who ever let himself get to attached to one type, he simply told stories, and entertained millions.

The Picture;

Naked (Mike Leigh, 1993)

The searing work of a master, Naked is an unrelenting rant, a dark and bitter portrait of lower class England in the 1990s. Revolving around Johnny, played with dark, bitter humour and a weary knowingness by David Thewlis, this film is all about him; we journey through this world with him and are constantly subjected to his rants. Whether or not you appreciate the film may depend entirely upon how you feel about him, this is not an easy film to stomach and it is absolutely certain that repeat viewings will do wonders for one’s appreciation of it. This is a dark, dark world of morally greay human beings, and yet Mike Leigh makes it endlessly fascinating by managing to probe through the wordiness to find the humanity in each and every one of the sublime cast.

The List is Life: #96

96.

The Dame;

Sissy Spacek.

Ever since her major film breakthrough in 1973 as the naive teenager Holly in Terrence Malick’s Badlands, Sissy Spacek has been an interesting actress to watch. Equally comfortable playing quiet, restrained young girls as she did in the Malick picture and in her most famous role to date in Brain DePalma’s Carrie, as she is at the ever popular art of cinema biopic-ing as she displayed in her Oscar winning turn as Loretta Lynn in Coal Miner’s Daughter, and as the quietly furious grieving mother in her final nominated turn to date in Todd Field’s In the Bedroom. She’s an actress capable of perfectly subtle and quiet, restrained turns.

The Dude;

Tom Hanks.

Many a term has been attached to Tom Hanks over his long and storied career. Whether we refer to him as the ultimate everyman, the new Jimmy Stewart, what cannot be denied is that over the two decades since his first Oscar nomination he has proven himself to be one of the most talented and capable actors of his generation. From his pure, unadulterated childhood innocence in Big, to the weary fighting spirit of Philadelphia, American simplicity in Forrest Gump, the quiet, humble masculinity of Saving Private Ryan, or the large stretches of wordlessness that populated Castaway, in which he held the screen with his physicality and nothing but a volleyball for company, Tom Hanks has proven a versatility not found among many of his era. Truly one of the good guys.

The Director;

Nicholas Ray.

Nicholas Ray left the University of Chicago after a year to study architecture on a scholarship under Frank Lloyd Wright where he learnt the importance of space and scope that would come in great use for a filmmaker with as beautiful an eye for visuals as he did. His socialist/communist leanings soon came between student and mentor and Ray departed for New York where he became involved in the theater until his good friend Elia Kazan hired him to work as assistant on feature debut, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. From there Ray’s star grew and grew till the mid 50s when he was doing some of the most iconic work in Hollywood, a western centred around a woman in the magnificent Johnny Guitar and the iconic Rebel Without a Cause, a title worthy of the rebel who guided it to immortality.

The Picture;

El Laberinto del Fauno (Guillermo Del Toro, 2006)

Guillermo Del Toro started making movies in 1993 and he has always had a taste for the fantastic, from the gothic horror of his first, Cronos, to the sci-fi thrills of his English language debut, Mimic, through the comic book rides of Blade II and Hellboy, Del Toro has always wandered in strange realms. That wandering finally came to a beautiful crescendo in 2006 as the Spaniard turned in the most acclaimed film of the year, a tale of startling fantasy and harsh reality, balancing both worlds with perfect precision and taking the audience into the imagination of a young girl, along the harsh road she travels and the difficult lessons she learns. It is a beautifully crafted dark fantasy, written, directed, performed, shot and scored with the greatest love and passion. Growing up and facing the world has never been so painful or so beautiful.

March 15, 2008

The List is Life: #97

97.

The Dame;

Cate Blanchett.

A decade on from her breakthrough role as Elizabeth I in Shekhar Kapur’s biographical drama, Cate Blanchett has firmly established herself as one of the most respected and acclaimed actresses in the business. Here is a woman who can play seemingly any role from virginal young British queens to male American rock stars, one Oscar already under her belt and many more sure to follow. Though the accusation of cold and mechanical has often been shot her way, the Australian has shown immense talent in the utterly free flowing and naturalistic Veronica Guerin, a very underappreciated and underseen film that may just be her best performance to date.

The Dude;

Marcello Mastroianni.

One of the great stars of European cinema, Marcello Mastroianni was one of the most naturally charismatic and effortlessly cool stars to ever stride across the silver screen. This was a man from a small Italian village, a man that during the second world war was interned in (and escaped from) a Nazi prison. Yet all this could not stop him from achieving international fame and the reputation of Italy’s finest actor. Despite being one of only two actors to win the Cannes film festival Best Actor award twice, Mastroianni is most remembered for his perfectly underplayed but endlessly effective starring roles in Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita and 8 1/2, two of the sixties most revered and iconic films, thanks in large part to him.

The Director;

Claude Chabrol.

When talk of the French New Wave is brought up, it is the names Godard and Truffaut that are most readily heralded, yet in 1958, aged just 28, Claude Chabrol directed his debut film Le Beau Serge, and with this small town examination of opposites he is the man who essentially kicked off the movement that revolutionized French cinema. In the half a century since then, Chabrol has continued to probe the depths of humanity as well as establishing himself in the mystery and thriller genre as a sort of French Hitchcock. Though most of his peers have either passed away or simply passed their best, Chabrol continues to work efficiently into his 78th year.

The Picture;

Titanic (James Cameron, 1997)

Everyone knows the statistics, 1.8 billion dollars at the international box office (that’s roughly 700,000 ,000 dollars more than it’s nearest rival. 700,000,000 is about the international box office gross of Michael Bay’s Transformers) a record equaling 14 Oscar nominations and a record equaling 11 Oscar wins. Yet at heart it is all very simple, this is a story about rich and poor united in the face of the most immense human tragedy, a story about the destructive nature of man’s continuing struggle to ascend to immortality, a story about breaking free, about love. It is, in the end, of the same stock as the old romantic epics in Hollywood history, and more than worthy of that status. It is a modern classic, that blends both blossoming romance and epic disaster to create one of the great stories in cinema. The ship may have sunk to the bottom of the ocean, but as far as the film goes, there is nothing but ascension on the horizon.

March 13, 2008

The List is Life: #98

98.

The Dame;

Paulette Goddard.

 Despite appearing in many fine films throughout the 30s and 40s not least as one of an all star cast in George Cukor’s The Women, Paulette Goddards career is most widely remembered for her place alongside Charles Chaplin in his masterful pictures Modern Times  and The Great Dictator. Chaplin’s Tramp was, and is, an iconic film character, and Paulette Goodard was the finest of all his leading ladies.

The Dude;

Harrison Ford.

One of the all time great movie stars. With more charm than a hundred cocky pretenders that have come in his wake, Harrison Ford emerged from humble beginnings in carpentry to become one of the cinemas great icons. Whether as the charismatic rogues in superstar franchises Star Wars  and Indiana Jones, working alongside cinematic maestros in films like Blade Runner, Witness  and Frantic or putting that effortless charm to perfect use as the driving force between riotously entertaining pictures like The Fugitive, Harrison Ford has remained a star throughout. 31 years after his initial breakthrough the man is still going strong and preparing to don that most legendary of fedoras one more time.

The Director;

George Lucas.

Though with each passing year since he first ventured into that galaxy, far far away George Lucas has become more a cinematic mogul than a filmmaker, the influence that he has had on the film business is absolutely unquestionable. From his earliest travels into the realms of Sci-Fi with THX-1138  through his nostalgic, teen movie gem American Graffiti  and into that immortal galaxy of filmic legend Lucas has proven himself a trail blazer and innovator in the medium. The influence of Star Wars  on the way major movies were made is unparalleled and the work that his THX sound company and Industrial Light & Magic visual effects company is beyond comparison. George Lucas has branched beyond his far off galaxy to have a mighty influence on the world of cinema.

The Picture;

Suspiria (Dario Argento, 1977)

The greatest slasher film ever made. Dario Argento’s horror masterpiece is a perfect exercise in the creation of fearful atmospheres and a masterclass in the use of wide open spaces to rack up unbearable tension. Accompanied by one of the creepiest scores in cinematic history, Argento uses vivid colours, darkness, empty space, and the elements in addition to the giallo genre’s trademark gore to present the viewer with the sort of terrifying experience that is not easily forgotten.

March 12, 2008

The List is Life: #99

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , — cigarettesalesman @ 10:51 pm

99.

The Dame;

Lauren Bacall.

Making her screen debut alongside a Hollywood legend at the age of just 19 can’t have been easy, but were you to see the smouldering confidence with which Lauren Bacall carries herself through To Have and Have Not, alongside her soon to be husband, Humphrey Bogart, and you’d think she was a seasoned pro. For over 60 years she has continued to turn in highly confident and mature work, time and time again. Her legendary status cannot be denied, and her beauty has probably lead to her being tremendously overlooked as an actress.

The Dude;

Sean Connery.

An absolute pro. His marvellous physique made him the perfect super spy in his prime yet as the decades have gone by, Sean Connery has displayed a natural and effortless screen charisma that only the true legends of the game could claim to possess. That he numbers among their rank, cannot be denied.

The Director;

Victor Fleming.

Victor Fleming began his directing career making fairly low key silent films. He finished it in the 1940s, making star vehicles with Spencer Tracy as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Ingrid Bergman as Joan of Arc. Yet in the end his career has been eternally defined (and rightfully so) by the year 1939, in which he snatched up the reigns and took control of the troubled productions of two all time classics, The Wizard of Oz and Gone with the Wind. Two bonafide iconic films, from entirely different ends of the spectrum, both steereed to the screen by the same man in the same year. Not bad a for a fella who started life in the business as a stuntman.

The Picture;

The Jungle Book (Wolfgang Reitherman, 1967)

Based (albeit loosely) on the book by Rudyard Kipling and as the last Disney film overseen by the great man himself, The Jungle Book could have coasted on the reputation that such claims would have afforded it. Yet the studio managed, even in the wake of its creators passing to rise up and turn out one of their most beloved classics. Catchy songs from start to finish keep all entertained, characters that are both zany and bold ensure that this is an experience the viewer shall never forget and laying at the heart of this animal kingdom is an entirely human story about a child growing up and accepting his destiny. The darker nature of Kipling’s story may have been replaced by something altogether more family-friendly, but the deep humanity at heart remains throughout.

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